2009

Indianapolis

2009

Big Island

Lionsgate

Home Entertainment

2008

Winner

2009

ReelHeart Toronto

SYNOPSIS

Red Pierre has come up from the mountains of a Mexican Monastery to avenge his dying father, who had been fatally wounded by the outlaw, Bob McGurk.   A man the locals say cannot be beaten to the draw.

But before Pierre can meet the invincible gunman, he’s picked up by Jim Boone and his gang, the Cut-Throats.  Despite the protests of the other outlaws, Boone makes Pierre a member of his gang, a replacement for his dead son. And so Pierre rides with the wild marauders, all skilled gunfighters, including Boone’s wild young daughter, Jack.

At last the scene is set for the showdown between Pierre and McGurk, but even when it takes place and a wounded McGurk leaves the range, the blood feud is not been settled. One of them still has to be killed.

Presented as a graphic homage to the classic Spaghetti Westerns, SHOOT FIRST AND PRAY YOU LIVE is a tale of love and Revenge.

**please click on actor’s name to view credits on IMDB**

CAST

RED PIERRE …………. Jeff Hephner (Tigerland, Easy Money)

BOB McGURK …………. James Russo (Public Enemies, Donnie Brosco, My Own Private Idaho)

JIM BOONE …………. John Doman (Mystic River, The Wire, City By TheSea)

MART RYDER …………. Jim Gaffigan (Three Kings, Away We Go, It’s Kind Of A Funny Story)

IRENE MELODY …………. Tamara Hope (The Deep End, Shall We Dance)

BLACK GANDIL …………. Richard Tyson (Black Hawk Down, There’s Something About Mary, Kindergarten Cop)

DICK WILBUR …………. Clay Wilcox (Lions for Lambs, Pirates of Silicon Valley, Deadwood)

JACK BOONE ………… Shannon Zeller (Seraphim Falls, Born of Earth)

GARRY PATTERSON …………. Chris Browning (Terminator Salvation, The Book of Eli, Let Me In, Cowboys and Aliens)

RODERIGO VENALES …………. Fredrick Lopez (All The Pretty Horses, White Sands)

PHIL BRANCH …………. Luce Rains (3:10 to Yuma, No Country for Old Men, Appaloosa, Legion)

MAC HURLEY …………. Stephen Payne (Rent, The Cake Eater)

CREW

WRITER / DIRECTOR …………. LANCE DOTY

PRODUCER…………. SAM WELCH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY …………. ROBERT BRUCE McCLEERY

EDITOR …………. CHARLY BENDER

LINE PRODUCER …………. LUCA CECCARELLI

PRODUCTION DESIGNER …………. SUSAN MAGESTRO

COSTUME DESIGNER …………. LAHLY POORE-ERICSON

COMPOSER …………. KEITH PATCHEL

CASTING DIRECTOR …………. AMY GOSSELS

We’ve Launched Our Latest “Temporary” site

Our New Site Weird to be talking about our new site on our new site.  But here it is:

IT’S OFFICIAL

Shoot First ArtworkSHOOT FIRST AND PRAY YOU LIVE is now available on DVD.  Extras include commentary, a making of video and many others.  Secure your copy today.

Release Date Set

Through Grindstone entertainment and Lions Gate, SHOOT FIRST AND PRAY YOU LIVE will be released on February 9, 2010.  Visit the major retailers to secure your copy.

NYC Screening – EVENT SOLD OUT

EVENT SOLD OUT

There will be a one-time screening in NYC on February 2 @ 7PM at 57 SCREENING ROOM:  140 West 57th Street.  We will be giving away 50 free tickets to this event, please keep checking in for updates on how get one.

What Is A Spaghetti Western?

Between 1960 and 1975, European film production companies made nearly 600 Westerns. Critics either blasted or ignored these films, and because most of them were financed by Italian companies, they called them  Spaghetti Westerns. Fans of the genre embraced the term which is now lovingly used to label any Western made and financed by Continental filmmakers.   Europeans have always loved Westerns and have always made them. As early as 1901, European directors tried their hand at this most American of art forms. The relatively few Eurowesterns made prior to 1960, though historically significant, never signified a trend and remain largely unknown, at least in the United States. People on the Continent relied on the American Western for their entertainment.

By 1960, the production of American Westerns had dwindled due to market forces, and distribution problems made them increasingly hard to obtain in Europe.  As a result, European producers began experimenting with home-grown oaters, mostly Spanish Zorro flicks and poorly dubbed imitations of American B Westerns.  The one exception was Michael Carreras’ Spanish-produced Savage Guns (1961) starring Richard Basehart and Alex Nichol, which proved that a well-produced, if not entirely original, Western could be made on foreign soil.  Still, the majority of these films were not very good, gaining only a meager foothold–which began slipping very quickly.

Artwork from Savage Guns

In 1962, however, German producer Horst Wendlandt and director Harald Reinl teamed up to make The Treasure of Silver Lake, based on the frontier stories of German writer Karl May.  Filmed in Yugoslavia with American actor Lex Barker and Frenchman Pierre Brice in the lead roles, this tongue-in-cheek adventure proved extremely popular with European audiences.  Other producers jumped on the bandwagon and by 1964 some two dozen German, Italian and Spanish Westerns had been made.  Quality was still generally bad and the films stylistically fared no better than the sword-and-sandal adventures (peplums) they replaced.  One notable film of this period was Ricardo Blasco’s Gunfight at Red Sands (1963) with Richard Harrison, who would eventually star in seventeen Spaghetti Westerns.

Then, an obscure director named Sergio Leone was given $200,000 and a load of leftover film stock and told to make a Western.  With a script based on Akira Kurosawa’s samurai epic Yojimbo, an American TV actor named Clint Eastwood, a music composer named Ennio Morricone, and a cameraman named Massimo Dallamano, Leone made what was essentially supposed to be a throw-away film; Per un Pugno di Dollari — A Fistful of Dollars.  This violent, cynical and visually stunning film introduced The Man With No Name, the anti-heroic gunslinger for whom money is the only motivation and the villains are merely obstacles to be removed. Many later films followed this formula of the lone gunman in pursuit of money to the exclusion of all else. Leone’s unique style, artistic camera angles, extension of time and raw, explosive violence presented a skewed view of the West, making his film different from any Western that had come before. Critics panned it for its brutal depiction of an unromantic West, but audiences loved it, and the Spaghetti Western took off like a bullet from a Colt .45.

A Fistful of Dollars
Artwork from A Fistful of Dollars

Our top 20 Spaghetti Westerns

Will be updated on a Daily Basis:

16. IL GRANDE DUELLO (The Grand Duel) with Lee Van Cleef

17.  TEPEPA by Giulio Petron

18.  BLINDMAN by Ferdinando Baldi

19.  FACE TO FACE (Facia a Facia) by Sergio Corbucci

20.  IL MERCENARIO by Sergio Corbucci — An awesome portrayal of revolution, realism and dark violence.

Big Island Film Festival

Screening information coming soon.

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